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Greene & Greene Gamble House Side Chair #5: Marc Adams School, Day 4

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Blog entry by TungOil posted 10-13-2017 01:14 AM 625 reads 0 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Marc Adams School, Day 3 Part 5 of Greene & Greene Gamble House Side Chair series Part 6: Marc Adams School, Day 5 »

Today I finished up the second tenon for the lower stretcher, then cut mortises with the Domino 500. This was my first time using the Domino. Once set up it’s a fool-proof method for cutting the mortises.

I did another quick dry assembly to be sure the lower stretcher parts fit together nicely.

With the lower stretcher out of the way, I start working on the curved back slats. The back slats will be assembled with dominos, have angled ends where they meet the apron and crest rail (compound angles in the case of the two smaller ones), are curved and have a profile cut.

I start with the center back slat. To get the angles for the ends correct and cut to the proper length, Bob Lang worked out a clever solution using what is basically an MDF story stick. I use a scrap of MDF and carefully transfer the angle from the dry assembled chair to the MDF and cut on the miter saw. I carefully trim away the MDF until the part matches my layout lines. Once I have the proper length worked out on the MDF scrap, I cut the angled ends into the real part in sapele.

Next I layout and bandsaw the curved faces. When the curves are complete, I temporarily tape the cutoff back in place and bandsaw the profile.

I originally thought the crest rail was going to be the most work on this chair, but I was wrong. Clearly the back slats are going to be the most difficult part of this project.

Next step- cut the dominos for the center slat then make the side slats.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"



5 comments so far

View PPK's profile

PPK

867 posts in 643 days


#1 posted 10-13-2017 01:10 PM

Tung,
are the dominoes supposed to fit that loose on the sides? (first pic) I’ve never used dominoes… it looks pretty slick if I ever got a bunch of extra money to spend on one of those things… The chair is looking awesome!

-- Pete

View pottz's profile

pottz

2218 posts in 818 days


#2 posted 10-13-2017 02:14 PM

lookin good tung.the domino is definitely a cool tool,expensive but worth every penny for what it does.im also wondering why you used the wide setting? was this too allow for easier alignment during assembly?keep it comin.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

741 posts in 329 days


#3 posted 10-13-2017 11:27 PM

yes, the slots are wide for adjustability. The domino cutter has three settings that allow the slot to be cut either snug to the domino, slightly loose and more loose. Most of those were cut in the middle setting so we had some adjustability. This was the first time I used the domino and I can see why folks like them so much. One nice thing about it was that it was absolutely dust free with the Festool vacuum hooked up.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View pottz's profile

pottz

2218 posts in 818 days


#4 posted 10-14-2017 01:53 AM

sounds like festool just sold another domino!-lol.im savin up for the big brother!

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View Mean_Dean's profile

Mean_Dean

5658 posts in 2981 days


#5 posted 10-14-2017 02:32 AM

Well, asked and answered on the Domino….............! (Referring to my comment in Day 3’s entry.)

I didn’t realize that the Domino can be set at three different settings—could also be used to allow for expansion/contraction where needed.

Guess I’ll head out and buy my Lottery ticket….....!

-- Dean -- "Don't give up the ship -- fight her 'till she sinks!" Capt James Lawrence USN

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