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Painting Over Rust Question

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Forum topic by DMiller posted 09-13-2017 02:07 PM 352 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DMiller

246 posts in 284 days


09-13-2017 02:07 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question lathe craftsman rust restoration

In the past week my brother and I have been rebuilding an older lathe. We have got all the paint removed, but there was quite a bit of rust also that was removed. Is there any paint/ primer that we could apply to keep future rust down before applying the paint? Thanks!

-- Dale Miller Modesto, CA "I can do all things through him that strengtheneth me." Philippians 4:13. "Woodworking minus patience equals firewood."


8 replies so far

View CharlesNeil's profile

CharlesNeil

2103 posts in 3682 days


#1 posted 09-13-2017 02:29 PM

After many years in the auto body business, paint ing over rust doesnt work, in reality it will actually speed it up , and while rust will spread, it takes a long time to go thru, grind it off and paint over and i no time its back and eating inward. you have to sandblast and get ALL the rust.
How ever today there are rust converting primers. Had a friend whos truck frame was in really bad shape, he Wire brushed it and sand blasted it some, to get the worst off and we applied this http://www.homedepot.com/p/Corroseal-Rust-Converter-Primer-82320/202960538
then painted over it with a rust inhibiting paint , thats been about 4 years ago and thus far no sign of rust ..
There are other available ,some in spray cans , but it does seem to work IMO

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4707 posts in 2304 days


#2 posted 09-13-2017 02:38 PM

This isn't exactly the same thing as what Charles mentioned, but I bought some to prime some fresh galvenized metal last fall. So far the paint has stuck to it just fine, and they claim it bonds with everything (damn near).

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View John_H's profile

John_H

50 posts in 1517 days


#3 posted 09-13-2017 05:45 PM

Take a look at POR-15. Very popular stuff for car enthusiasts
http://www.por15.com/POR-15_Rust_Preventive_Coating

It has been my experience that it works great. You can apply it with a brush or spray, but be careful – if you get any on you, it is extremely difficult to get off

If it is going to be exposed to sunlight, you may want to use their topcoat

Here is another product to consider, but I have no experience with it
https://www.kbs-coatings.com/

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

5899 posts in 2010 days


#4 posted 09-13-2017 06:12 PM

Remove the rust as completely as you can… electrolysis, evapo-rust, wire-wheel in a drill, etc… once you get it removed, give the part a good wipe down with a dilute phosphoric acid solution. You can find the stuff at the BORG pretty cheap… such as this: Klean-strip Prep-n-etch

I mix the above about 50/50 with distilled water. Remove the rust, and then give it a good wipe down with the acid solution. It will take care of any hidden stuff remaining. Then just before painting, I will usually give it a wipe down with acetone to remove any residual crap. As a benefit, with that method – you don’t need to prime first… just paint with a good oil based enamel and it will be fine. I have machines that I’ve restored that were severe rust buckets, and not a lick of rust has returned.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View jonah's profile

jonah

1374 posts in 3110 days


#5 posted 09-13-2017 07:00 PM

Evapo-Rust is the ticket. Build some sort of vessel to submerge the thing and your rust problem will be solved.

Then just prime it and paint with a good quality paint.

View Hermit's profile

Hermit

135 posts in 1136 days


#6 posted 09-13-2017 07:09 PM

I used rustoleum’s “rust reformer ” on my gate 3 years ago. Still looks as good as new. You can find it just about anywhere.

-- I'm like the farmer's duck. If it don't rain, I'll walk.

View DMiller's profile

DMiller

246 posts in 284 days


#7 posted 09-13-2017 07:24 PM

Ok, will have to research some of these products! Thanks for the advice!

-- Dale Miller Modesto, CA "I can do all things through him that strengtheneth me." Philippians 4:13. "Woodworking minus patience equals firewood."

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

3559 posts in 2220 days


#8 posted 09-14-2017 03:32 AM



Remove the rust as completely as you can… electrolysis, evapo-rust, wire-wheel in a drill, etc… once you get it removed, give the part a good wipe down with a dilute phosphoric acid solution. You can find the stuff at the BORG pretty cheap… such as this: Klean-strip Prep-n-etch

I mix the above about 50/50 with distilled water. Remove the rust, and then give it a good wipe down with the acid solution. It will take care of any hidden stuff remaining. Then just before painting, I will usually give it a wipe down with acetone to remove any residual crap. As a benefit, with that method – you don t need to prime first… just paint with a good oil based enamel and it will be fine. I have machines that I ve restored that were severe rust buckets, and not a lick of rust has returned.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

Learned this trick about acetone from a automotive painter. For years I just used brake cleaner and sometimes it peeled or had other issues. Started using the acetone and never a problem. Good tip MrUnix

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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