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Forum topic by Sanderguy777 posted 05-16-2018 02:50 PM 1021 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Sanderguy777

179 posts in 1287 days


05-16-2018 02:50 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question workbench painting

So I am wanting to build a version of the one minute work bench 2.0. If you look that up on, YouTube you can see a video of what I’m talking about but basically, it holds a table saw, air compressor and a mitre saw in the table saw out feed table.

My version will be olny be about 4 feet long and 3 feet wide to fit my available space. I want the table saw to be the main thing but I also need space for my miter saw and since I have a tiny air compressor, why not?

The questions so far are:

1. 4 or 5 inch locking casters? I can have either, but will the 5 inch roll over things better? Garden hose, pebbles, driveway cracks, etc.

2. Entire thing will probably be made of 1/2 osb. The top of the out feed table will be either osb or mdf. 2 layers thick so it should be plenty strong…should I use the osb or will it be too rough?

3. I want to paint the entire thing a florescent lime green and black. If I paint the out feed top, will the paint peel or scratch?
3.5. will satin or matte be better than gloss?

4. Poly urethane? On the top or not?

Thanks guys. Its good to be back

-- Marc Spagnuolo (standing in front of clamp wall): I think I need a few more . Me (owner of at least 8 clamps):.....?


20 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1249 posts in 247 days


#1 posted 05-16-2018 03:12 PM

look – you are in a productive woodworking – carpenter atmosphere.
THINGS GET SCRATCHED !! regardless of what finish is used.
and fluorescent lime green and black scratches the easiest of all.
brown latex house paint would be my choice. Valspar StormCoat is an excellent paint.
it is thick and will clog a lot of holes in the OSB and will make your project look great.
and in all my years of using OSB – I have never, ever seen a “scratch” on a panel.
the top surface could be 1/4” MDF with a poly finish held down with countersunk screws.
easy and cheap to replace when the time comes.
and the bigger the castor – the easier it is to roll over stuff. HF has pretty good 6” castors.

if you over think it – it will surely be over thunk.

.

.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

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RobHannon

141 posts in 615 days


#2 posted 05-16-2018 03:31 PM

John is right on with everything he said. For OSB I still would paint it just to avoid any moisture absorption. Bigger wheels is going to make it much easier to move. It looks like the major feature of that bench is mobility so I would not cut corners on wheels. I have done that in the past and regretted it.

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John Smith

1249 posts in 247 days


#3 posted 05-16-2018 04:43 PM

I forgot to add – I have said this several times before. . . . .
build your project FIRST – - – THEN figure out what finish you want.
talking about paint or finish for a project that is not even built yet
is like putting the cart before the horse.

good luck in your project – looks like a fun build.

.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

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woodbutcherbynight

5491 posts in 2494 days


#4 posted 05-16-2018 04:59 PM

1. For casters get the weight rating up, size is important but what weight they can handle is just as important.
2. OSB, umm not recommended. For a bit more you can use BC plywood or one grade up, edgeband it with wood and never worry about water as you would with OSB.
3. Painting the side and such, even the drawers sure whatever color you like. Gloss or satin? Gloss wipes off and leaves no stain, satin not as much.
4. For the top use MDF and Formica. The Formica will last a long time and you don’t have to worry about transferring paint to your work. Easy clean up as well and wood glue does not stick well so no worries about gluing something to the bench and all is ruined.

How good would such plywood look when done?
Just posted full project today but here is one picture.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1787 posts in 2074 days


#5 posted 05-16-2018 07:59 PM



I forgot to add – I have said this several times before. . . . .
build your project FIRST – - – THEN figure out what finish you want.
talking about paint or finish for a project that is not even built yet
is like putting the cart before the horse

- John Smith

Not to start a debate, and for the benefit of the inexperienced, I have exactly the opposite opinion – design the complete finish schedule when designing the project. I’ve made many design changes to a given project due to the finishing types or methods to be used. Not nearly as important for shop “furniture”, it is very impotant for fine furniture.

View Sanderguy777's profile

Sanderguy777

179 posts in 1287 days


#6 posted 05-16-2018 08:22 PM

John: I understand that I should build it first. The reason I want to think about the finish now is that when I put it in Sketchup, I can see how it will look. Also, Home Depot has a sale on paint for the next week so 30 dollar gallons for 20 bucks…
What “scratch” are you talking about? The bench osb scratched, or a project panel?
Main reason I am not building right now is because I have finals next week…

Rob: for sure painting the cabinet, with something. I want it to look good for a while…. LOL
Are Home Depot 5 inch locking swivel casters good? About 13 bucks each. And hold in excess of 380lbs each(4 inch ones hold 380, so 5 inch should be more).

WBBN: what is bc plywood? A grade?
I really don’t want to edge band because it is just shop furniture and I don’t have a the equipment to do that fast or well.

I am thinking of 1/2 inch plywood or OSB for the main cabinet and mdf or Formica for the top. All pieces glued except the work top because I will replace it when I gets to worn.

-- Marc Spagnuolo (standing in front of clamp wall): I think I need a few more . Me (owner of at least 8 clamps):.....?

View RobHannon's profile

RobHannon

141 posts in 615 days


#7 posted 05-16-2018 08:35 PM


Rob: for sure painting it. I want it to look good for a while….
Are Home Depot 5 inch locking swivel casters good? About 13 bucks each. And hold in excess of 380lbs each(4 inch ones hold 380, so 5 inch should be more).

- Sanderguy777

Never used those ones specifically. I have had some problems with poly wheels developing flat spots and eventually de-laminating from the wheel hub. I don’t think this would happen if the tool is not resting on the wheels for long periods. My tools will always be on concrete or asphalt so non-marring wheels are not a feature I need and I will opt for steel wheels when I can.

View Rich's profile

Rich

3349 posts in 674 days


#8 posted 05-16-2018 11:12 PM


I forgot to add – I have said this several times before. . . . .
build your project FIRST – - – THEN figure out what finish you want.
talking about paint or finish for a project that is not even built yet
is like putting the cart before the horse

- John Smith

Not to start a debate, and for the benefit of the inexperienced, I have exactly the opposite opinion – design the complete finish schedule when designing the project. I’ve made many design changes to a given project due to the finishing types or methods to be used. Not nearly as important for shop “furniture”, it is very impotant for fine furniture.

- OSU55

+1. Particularly with a workstation like that in the video, there will be areas that are difficult to access after it’s built. Better to put whatever finish you’re going to use on, especially the interior pieces, before assembly.

I also agree with woodbutcher about the plywood. I’d never use OSB for anything other than sheathing. I don’t think of it as a structural material. With plywood you can cut dados, rabbets, use screws, etc with much better results.

The HD locking casters are excellent. I’ve used them on all of my mobile cabinets. The locking mechanism not only prevents the wheel from rolling, but it locks the swivel in place too, so the cabinet is very stable.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Sanderguy777's profile

Sanderguy777

179 posts in 1287 days


#9 posted 05-17-2018 12:02 AM

Link to the video I saw. 7:20 is the dimensions of the original. Mine will be 4ft long and at least 32” deep if not 36”.
The bench is designed to live in the garage and be rolled into the middle of the garage to be used.
I plan to roll it into my driveway and be able to work on it there. Here are some photos of the design so far…


My specific questions are: do I need to not paint the top at all? No paint of any kind, and no polyurethane?
If I can afford laminate, is Formica the best or will any laminate do?

Since it will be out in the sun when I use it, would matte or satin paint work better than gloss? I don’t want to go blind looking at top of my table LOL!

So OSB is out since it is only a few bucks cheaper and it will be much harder to fasten to. Is it better to use 1/2 inch plywood or 3/4?

-- Marc Spagnuolo (standing in front of clamp wall): I think I need a few more . Me (owner of at least 8 clamps):.....?

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5491 posts in 2494 days


#10 posted 05-17-2018 12:09 AM

I once though edgebanding was difficult, and needed special tools and such. Not so. If you can cut a piece of wood to size and use glue it can be done. Remove excess glue with some sanding and you are ready to go. It does add time to the project but what better place to practice the skill than a shop project?

BC plywood is bare bones plywood usually used for sheathing. Next grade up is BCX will have one side nice, one side crappy. If you are feeling like being frustrated alot you can try that fancy $55 a sheet oak, maple, or whatvever plywood at the borg. Just know the veneer is very thin. As in if you look at it too many times it is gone. Nevermind sanding the stuff.

As Rich said some places tend to be hard to get finish or paint on once completed. Last few years I have been pre finishing a great deal of my projects as a result and feel it gives a better overall look. BUT, this does add time and patience to the project. If you want that 30 min and here ya go project, this method probably is going to not work.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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Sanderguy777

179 posts in 1287 days


#11 posted 05-17-2018 12:31 AM



As Rich said some places tend to be hard to get finish or paint on once completed. Last few years I have been pre finishing a great deal of my projects as a result and feel it gives a better overall look. BUT, this does add time and patience to the project. If you want that 30 min and here ya go project, this method probably is going to not work.

- woodbutcherbynight

Will I be able to glue it after I paint?

-- Marc Spagnuolo (standing in front of clamp wall): I think I need a few more . Me (owner of at least 8 clamps):.....?

View Rich's profile

Rich

3349 posts in 674 days


#12 posted 05-17-2018 12:43 AM


Will I be able to glue it after I paint?

- Sanderguy777

Glue won’t stick to paint, so you’ll have to account for that. You can use painter’s tape to block the paint from going on edges you’ll be gluing. If you’re cutting dados and rabbets, you can either paint before cutting them (and be very careful not to mar the surface when you do the cuts), or cut them first and line them with painter’s tape.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5491 posts in 2494 days


#13 posted 05-17-2018 01:37 AM

Having looked at your drawing I would suggest a different approach to the bottom of your cabinet.

While this is crappy picture you can see I have added a frame inside this cabinet. Then attached the sides and back to it. You can do this at the top, (I do for work benches) or use plywood. I find having plywood cut to the exact same dimensions as my frame aids greatly in getting it all lined up and keeping it square. Some will say overkill but for a mobile cabinet overkill would be a plus. Because who wants to push this thing and it gets caught and you push harder and it collapses or you break it. (Might be I have done this. LOL)

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

9867 posts in 1571 days


#14 posted 05-17-2018 01:44 AM

What is this sorcery called paint you speak of :)

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1249 posts in 247 days


#15 posted 05-17-2018 02:35 AM

sor·cer·y = paint is varnish that you can’t see through, often in different colors.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

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