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Forum topic by woodbutcherbynight posted 06-17-2018 05:21 PM 801 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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woodbutcherbynight

5594 posts in 2580 days


06-17-2018 05:21 PM

Topic tags/keywords: resource tip question

There are many different ways to make mobile bases. From the design, based on strength for heavy work benches to lighter duty utility style type bases. I read a lot of posts about going all mobile in shops. Pro’s and con’s for both sides of this as well as some built in and some mobile. In a recent discussion over breakfast a buddy pointed out a interesting issue that I also have. What do you do for shops built on old patios or shops with uneven ground? In my shop (built by previous owner on a 16×20 patio) the drop one direction is ½ inch to 5/8 inch per foot in some places and the opposite direction about ¼ inch.

So do you build the base and add leveling blocks after you put it in place? This way when you move it is level elsewhere, or level again when moved? Or built to be level where you want it and when moved if ever deal with it again?

In making this a discussion let’s also add how size is a consideration. Lessons learned on builds and pictures of what you have done with yours. Other members have similar issues, or may in the future and might benefit from tips we all can offer here.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.


14 replies so far

View ralbuck's profile

ralbuck

5254 posts in 2438 days


#1 posted 06-17-2018 05:40 PM

One idea would be to make blocks for the places that you normally position that tool. They could be color coded to be able to remember which goes where easier too.

I am thinking a U shaped that would be easy to position and remove; yet still stay! A little heavy foam glued to the bottoms would also help. Think a door stop with sides that cradle the wheels they need to support.

I have never been unhappy that I built something STURDY! I have been when it was to lightly made though. I have reinforced factory stands too.

Hope this idea helps.

-- Wood rescue is good for the environment and me! just rjR

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

8706 posts in 3014 days


#2 posted 06-17-2018 08:45 PM

My shop is similar as I screwed up by not doing the floor first in the rebuild. Have heavy duty grizzly mobil bases for very heavy equipment like my cabinet saw. Added half inch spacers to the casters when I upgraded to a 17 inch bandsaw. Tested it in rolling over humps before setting my new bandsaw on the old 14 inch saw’s base. Works great.

Due to increase in equipment and size of equipment the fixed benches are becoming mobile benches

*https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIxPpqpY12k*

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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woodbutcherbynight

5594 posts in 2580 days


#3 posted 06-17-2018 09:05 PM



My shop is similar as I screwed up by not doing the floor first in the rebuild. Have heavy duty grizzly mobil bases for very heavy equipment like my cabinet saw. Added half inch spacers to the casters when I upgraded to a 17 inch bandsaw. Tested it in rolling over humps before setting my new bandsaw on the old 14 inch saw s base. Works great.

Due to increase in equipment and size of equipment the fixed benches are becoming mobile benches

*https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIxPpqpY12k*

- DocSavage45

I believe many of us are having to rethink going mobile as we get larger machines but our shops remain same size.

LOL

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View hairy's profile

hairy

2780 posts in 3704 days


#4 posted 06-17-2018 09:47 PM

In my basement shop all the floor slopes towards the drain. I built this base with leveling built in.

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/15760

-- My reality check bounced...

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DocSavage45

8706 posts in 3014 days


#5 posted 06-17-2018 09:59 PM

Hope you get more ideas. LOL!

Have a design for my outfeed table/project table w/castors similar to hairy’s

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View Shamb3's profile

Shamb3

36 posts in 353 days


#6 posted 06-17-2018 11:29 PM

I am a fan of this bench design with some leveling feet on it. http://lumberjocks.com/projects/325409
You could slide leveling blocks under the legs before setting it down for other locations.

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

21504 posts in 3277 days


#7 posted 06-17-2018 11:40 PM

Any base will not fit well on an uneven floor. I’d suggest making wedges to drive in to take the wobble out. On my table saw, I put some ears with threads in them and then I made long rods with threads on the bottom end and rubber foot at the tip and a crank on the top end. I did this to lock it in place, but it would also work for an uneven floor situation!!

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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woodbutcherbynight

5594 posts in 2580 days


#8 posted 06-18-2018 01:35 AM



In my basement shop all the floor slopes towards the drain. I built this base with leveling built in.

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/15760

- hairy

Interesting design!! So if you want to move it just raise the feet up until wheels touch then move as needed?

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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woodbutcherbynight

5594 posts in 2580 days


#9 posted 06-18-2018 01:36 AM



I am a fan of this bench design with some leveling feet on it. http://lumberjocks.com/projects/325409
You could slide leveling blocks under the legs before setting it down for other locations.

- Shamb3

I saw this and my only issue was it takes up alot of valuable space under the table. As far as design though it is sturdy and would handle a heavy load.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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woodbutcherbynight

5594 posts in 2580 days


#10 posted 06-18-2018 01:37 AM



Hope you get more ideas. LOL!

Have a design for my outfeed table/project table w/castors similar to hairy s

- DocSavage45

Yeah I am looking!!! Besides this is not a topic I found much discussion on as of late. Might give fresh ideas for everyone.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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woodbutcherbynight

5594 posts in 2580 days


#11 posted 06-18-2018 01:39 AM



Any base will not fit well on an uneven floor. I d suggest making wedges to drive in to take the wobble out. On my table saw, I put some ears with threads in them and then I made long rods with threads on the bottom end and rubber foot at the tip and a crank on the top end. I did this to lock it in place, but it would also work for an uneven floor situation!!

Cheers, Jim

- Jim Jakosh

I like this idea, have to look into if I can adapt it to the wheels themselves or find a way to have it inside the cabinet. Say remove bottom drawer and raise and lower as needed.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View hairy's profile

hairy

2780 posts in 3704 days


#12 posted 06-19-2018 12:59 PM


In my basement shop all the floor slopes towards the drain. I built this base with leveling built in.

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/15760

- hairy

Interesting design!! So if you want to move it just raise the feet up until wheels touch then move as needed?

- woodbutcherbynight

Yes. The bottom side of the angle iron has a nut welded on. There is a jam nut to maintain placement on the top side. Roll it into position, raise the base and level it as you raise it.

-- My reality check bounced...

View Bill_Steele's profile

Bill_Steele

432 posts in 1903 days


#13 posted 06-19-2018 03:50 PM

I used something very similar to these leg levelers and when I want to raise or lower them I use a cordless drill with a hex bit and a flexible extension. I wouldn’t want to raise and lower them frequently because it takes a few minutes—but it sure beats doing them by hand.

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woodbutcherbynight

5594 posts in 2580 days


#14 posted 06-20-2018 01:41 AM



I used something very similar to these leg levelers and when I want to raise or lower them I use a cordless drill with a hex bit and a flexible extension. I wouldn t want to raise and lower them frequently because it takes a few minutes—but it sure beats doing them by hand.

- Bill_Steele

Well some cabinets we only move in a great while when doing, wait for it…. Clean – Up!

So while cumbersome this idea may be best application.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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