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Forum topic by Abter posted 06-18-2018 03:31 PM 340 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Abter

66 posts in 678 days


06-18-2018 03:31 PM

Topic tags/keywords: morse drill chuck taper lathe

I have a Woodriver jacobs chuck. I like the chuck part a lot…heavy duty and solid feel. But I have a problem with the Morse Taper part. The drill chuck has two parts. One part is the drill chuck part, with the jaws, gears and holes for the key to tighten it. The other part is a bar style thingy (technical term) device with a taper on each end. I don’t even know the proper name of the this part, which is what I have a problem with. I will call it the connector bar.

One end of this bar has a #2 Morse taper that fits into the head or tail stock. The other end is also a taper. This end of the bar does not appear to be at the standard Morse taper angle, but it works the same.

The #2 Morse had a threaded hole at the end that goes into the head/tail stock. That is great…you can put an all thread rod through your head/tail stock, and use a nut (plus something like a fender washer or wooden disk) to create a solid connection of the Morse taper bar with the head/tail stock. That puppy ain’t going nowhere.

But the taper at the other end of the bar is only a jam chuck. There is no way to firmly keep the chuck-and-bar assembly in the strongly seated in the chuck. It works fine if I am doing spindle turning with support from the tail stock. But when I am doing face turning, such as completing the top end of a bottle stopper, the connector bar tends to come out of the chuck part. Its not a problem if I am turning on the actual top of the wood stock; the cutting tool or sand paper is keeping the chuck on the connector bar. But if I’m cutting or sanding pushing away from the head stock, the chuck tends to spin off the connector bar. When I tap the chuck end somewhat to try to firmly seat the connector bar into the chuck, it will stay connected for a while but then lets go.

MY QUESTION (finally, I know); what can I do to prevent the chuck part from falling off the connector part? Should use some compound on that taper to keep it together, sort of like removable loctite? I can’t think of any reason I would ever want to remove the connector bar from the chuck, but I suppose its possible. Perhaps if I want to replace the connector bar with a #1 morse taper end to go into the other lathe in our woodshop ?? Put the chuck part on a regular drill press?

Any suggestions appreciated.

-- "Many men fish all their lives without ever realizing that it is not the fish they are after." {often mis-quoted as by H.D. Thoreau}


10 replies so far

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

5460 posts in 3714 days


#1 posted 06-18-2018 04:02 PM

You are talking about the arbor … has a #2 morse taper for your tailstock, and (probably) a JT33 taper for the chuck.

Just take it off the lathe, retract the jaws all of the way into the chuck, put the end of the chuck on a block of wood and WHACK the tapered end of the arbor with a wooden mallet or rubber hammer.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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Abter

66 posts in 678 days


#2 posted 06-18-2018 04:11 PM

What a great answer: short, clearly written, makes sense, won’t break anything, and I get to whack something hard!

thanks…this is exactly the advice I needed. Once again the Lumberjock community knows all, shares all.

-- "Many men fish all their lives without ever realizing that it is not the fish they are after." {often mis-quoted as by H.D. Thoreau}

View Jack Lewis's profile

Jack Lewis

287 posts in 1129 days


#3 posted 06-18-2018 04:19 PM

A second method is to use the method Capt’ Eddie suggests for carbide inserts. A drop of medium CA glue and wa laa the thiney is set until you apply a little heat to break the seal.

-- "PLUMBER'S BUTT! Get over it, everybody has one"

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12014 posts in 2431 days


#4 posted 06-18-2018 05:11 PM

Machine tapers don’t handle side loads and will come apart without tailstock support, that’s why lathe spindles have threads. Also why using a drill press as a drum sander will sometimes pop the chuck off. You can get drill chucks that thread onto an arbor so they can’t come off. If the above remedies don’t fix it long term you might consider getting a proper threaded lathe chuck like a Nova G3.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6824 posts in 2250 days


#5 posted 06-18-2018 05:38 PM

You can get drill chucks that thread onto an arbor so they can t come off. If the above remedies don t fix it long term you might consider getting a proper threaded lathe chuck like a Nova G3.
- Woodknack

When I first read the post, I was thinking that the drill chuck was being used as… well… a drill chuck :)

Trying to use it to replace a scroll type chuck just doesn’t seem like a good idea, although I’m sure it can be made to work if that is all you got.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Woodknack

12014 posts in 2431 days


#6 posted 06-18-2018 05:48 PM

He’s using it for bottle stoppers.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Abter

66 posts in 678 days


#7 posted 06-18-2018 06:53 PM

I bought a tapping mandrill that I put in the chuck. The mandrill has too thin a shaft to hold in one of my lathe chucks, but the jacobs chuck works great. So I guess I am using the jacobs chuck as a drill chuck (although to hold a tap instead of a drill bit). I tap the pre-drilled stopper blank by turning the chuck by hand (also using tail stock for support). Once fully tapped the the tap also serves as a screw chuck, using the 1” flat metal piece permanently attached to the tap. This metal disk serves as a guide to help make the stopper bottom the same size as the stopper kit needs. This metal piece is equivalent to the correct sized bushings used to make a pen.

-- "Many men fish all their lives without ever realizing that it is not the fish they are after." {often mis-quoted as by H.D. Thoreau}

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12014 posts in 2431 days


#8 posted 06-18-2018 07:16 PM

Is the tap too small for pin Jaws?

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

5460 posts in 3714 days


#9 posted 06-18-2018 07:38 PM

Actually, for bottle stoppers, a better choice might be a collet chuck. They are inexpensive, and with a piece of all-thread, a nut, and a fender washer, won’t come out of the headstock or let your workpiece go airborne.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6824 posts in 2250 days


#10 posted 06-18-2018 08:21 PM

Actually, for bottle stoppers, a better choice might be a collet chuck. They are inexpensive, and with a piece of all-thread, a nut, and a fender washer, won t come out of the headstock or let your workpiece go airborne.
- TheDane

Wow… I have a bottle stopper mandrel and I didn’t even know it :)

Not what Gerry suggests, but just some scrap wood that threads directly onto the spindle with an embedded 3/8” x 16 tpi bolt in it. Made it for some knobs I had to make at one time. I’ve actually made a few different ones with different sized bolts for different projects (rotors, wheels, etc…). Best part is they don’t cost anything!

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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