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What are these pot racks called?

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Forum topic by boston_guy posted 08-02-2018 12:30 PM 604 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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boston_guy

160 posts in 2232 days


08-02-2018 12:30 PM

See the first photo in the link below. There are 2 pot rack strips on the ceiling. Is there a name for this pot rack style?

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/222138

Any feedback will be highly appreciated for I’d like to see whether I can get them.


20 replies so far

View RobHannon's profile

RobHannon

141 posts in 613 days


#1 posted 08-02-2018 12:43 PM

I have always heard them called ceiling or hanging pot racks. Very doable DIY project, but lots of off the shelf styles out there.

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1097 posts in 2932 days


#2 posted 08-02-2018 12:58 PM

Classical Japanese style called Huk Son Seeling….. :-)

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1244 posts in 245 days


#3 posted 08-02-2018 01:16 PM

Huk Son Seeling ~ ~ almost fell outta my chair LAFFING !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

BG: you don’t “get them” anywhere ~ you custom MAKE them for your kitchen.

strip of wood, some “eye bolts” into “T-Nuts” through the wood, some “S” hooks to hold the utensils.
eye “screws” are threaded into the wood and “may” strip out under stress and pull out.
eye “bolts” are threaded into a T-Nut for strength.
a drop or two of LokTite Threadlocker will help keep the eye bolts from turning loose.
the reason I suggest the ”S” hooks is that they come in several sizes and easy to switch around.
or – make your own hooks with some standard 1/8” round stock from the Box Store.
ensure the wood strip is securely fastened into the ceiling joists – not just the drywall.
for colored hardware: rinse well with acetone then hot soapy water and spray paint your choice of color.
Edit: if you are a little industrious, you could install T-Track into the wood and have sliding hooks !!!

.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

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John Smith

1244 posts in 245 days


#4 posted 08-02-2018 02:27 PM

Pot Hanger with sliding hooks

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-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

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HonestlyMediocre

22 posts in 33 days


#5 posted 08-02-2018 03:24 PM

FYI, in the linked project the maker is clear that the walnut strips simply mark the location of the ceiling joists. In this instance, the eye-bolts would have lag screw ends and mount directly into the joist. The walnut is just for finish. This also lets you use a thinner piece of stock. If you use the method John displays, you’ll need thicker stock as that is supporting the pots. The frequency of the connection to the joist will determine how thick the stock must be.

Personally, I’d use the eye-bolt with lag and go right into the ceiling joist—fewer parts to buy. The T-Track method John shows is quite nice, however, and the versatility is appealing.

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John Smith

1244 posts in 245 days


#6 posted 08-02-2018 04:01 PM

Mediocre – my ceiling joists go perpendicular across the kitchen island
so I must use the heavier 1×2 or 1×4 for the rigidity. each situation will be different .
thus the T-Nuts come into play when it is not possible to follow the joist with lags.
my wife just saw the drawings I made and will start “her” pot hanger project
this afternoon using 1×2 oak wood strips with the T-Track system.
it will be posted to my projects page early next week. (all the hardware will be flat black).
and I will also be installing about 12ft of the horizontal wall mount T-Tack in the garage.
this will tell me how much lateral force the aluminum T-Tracks and eye bolts
can hold before becoming deformed.

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-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

View hairy's profile

hairy

2742 posts in 3615 days


#7 posted 08-02-2018 05:01 PM

It’s a strip of hardwood. About 36” long, 1 and 1/2” wide x 1/4”thick, with hooks going through the strip into the above floor joist.

https://www.lowes.com/pd/National-Hardware-Ceiling-Hook/1000476969

Huk Son Seeling, of course!

-- My reality check bounced...

View boston_guy's profile

boston_guy

160 posts in 2232 days


#8 posted 08-04-2018 06:32 PM

JS,

I must say that I was very impressed with your diagram. You no doubt know what you’re doing and produce really good work. I love the way you laid out the diagram.

For starters and at the risk of sounding really dumb, how can you tell where the joists are located since they’re above the ceiling?

Also, if I manage to create such a pot rack, I’d love to have two and have them to the left of the cabinet above microwave in the photo below. They can run horizontally or vertically. But what if there’s no joist above this area?

Another dumb question: Do you drill in the eye bolts first so that you can know where to position the T-nuts?

I’m very appreciative of all the folks who have responded to my thread.

View boston_guy's profile

boston_guy

160 posts in 2232 days


#9 posted 08-04-2018 06:49 PM

HM,

I hear what you’re saying and I appreciate your thoughts. I just think, however, that the way JS has done it is really cool. :)

I think you know what I mean.


FYI, in the linked project the maker is clear that the walnut strips simply mark the location of the ceiling joists. In this instance, the eye-bolts would have lag screw ends and mount directly into the joist. The walnut is just for finish. This also lets you use a thinner piece of stock. If you use the method John displays, you ll need thicker stock as that is supporting the pots. The frequency of the connection to the joist will determine how thick the stock must be.

Personally, I d use the eye-bolt with lag and go right into the ceiling joist—fewer parts to buy. The T-Track method John shows is quite nice, however, and the versatility is appealing.

- HonestlyMediocre


FYI, in the linked project the maker is clear that the walnut strips simply mark the location of the ceiling joists. In this instance, the eye-bolts would have lag screw ends and mount directly into the joist. The walnut is just for finish. This also lets you use a thinner piece of stock. If you use the method John displays, you ll need thicker stock as that is supporting the pots. The frequency of the connection to the joist will determine how thick the stock must be.

Personally, I d use the eye-bolt with lag and go right into the ceiling joist—fewer parts to buy. The T-Track method John shows is quite nice, however, and the versatility is appealing.

- HonestlyMediocre


View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1244 posts in 245 days


#10 posted 08-04-2018 06:56 PM

thanks BG – finding the trusses is about the same as finding wall studs.
either with an electronic stud finder or hit-n-miss with a skinny phillips head
screwdriver poking holes until you find one. . . . then, 16” apart from there.
or – the thump thump thump with your fist until you find what sounds like solid wood.
my ceilings and all my walls are 1/2” drywall with 1/2” plaster. it is a 1957 block
Ranch Style home and finding ceiling joists and wall studs is a challenge to say the least.
some plumbing issues have set me back a couple of days in the hanger project but
photos should be posted by Monday or Tuesday.

I did find an error in my drawing this morning.
to hang pot lids by the lip on “S” hooks, the eye bolt must run parallel with the track
in order for the lids to “nest” neatly. also, some big spoons and ladles should be
considered before making them permanent with LokTite Threadlocker.
some T-Track accepts the standard 1/4” hex nut and some don’t. the regular type takes
the sliding T-Nut designed for the T-Track. (I bought mine off of ebay).
Loc-Tite comes in flexible (removable) and permanent (non-removable).
so the flexible will allow you to adjust the eye bolts to your needs.
my hanger is 48” 1×2 with the embedded track. if you are following the joist,
you don’t really need the wood strip – it is just ornamental. your call on that one.
and to reiterate: lag eye bolts are not adjustable to the items being held in the average kitchen.
and for me personally ~ I need the flexibility for the different sized items.
also – it is not for a fashion show – it is for actual use to get the utensils out of the cabinet
looking forward to seeing your rendition of the hanger !!

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

View backup2one's profile

backup2one

24 posts in 64 days


#11 posted 08-04-2018 07:03 PM

how can you tell where the joists are located since they’re above the ceiling?

You need a stud finder. I used to be able to find them with my knuckle knocking on the ceiling but that has become harder for me. Once you think you know where they are you can hammer small nails through the sheetrock to make sure you can find the center of the truss. Your piece of wood will cover the small nail holes.
As long as your piece of wood attaches to at least 2 trusses you should be good to go.
I would also forgo the tee nuts and just use a lag hook into the piece of wood. This will be plenty strong enough.
No way a 3 or 4lb pan is going to pull a hook out of the board.

View boston_guy's profile

boston_guy

160 posts in 2232 days


#12 posted 08-04-2018 07:06 PM

The photo below shows my favorite cookware. I use these skillets a lot and I’d love to have them hanging on a pot rack over my gas range. Right now I have them on my small kitchen island and they take up too much room!

View backup2one's profile

backup2one

24 posts in 64 days


#13 posted 08-04-2018 07:10 PM

Take a piece of scrap and put your hooks in it first to see how your pans will hang, then make any adjustments to the hooks on your scrap until you get them how you want them, then transfer the location to your board you will be using.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1244 posts in 245 days


#14 posted 08-04-2018 08:55 PM

well – I got a move on it just to have something useful to put on a project page.
it is done and in paint now – so in the morning will have finished photos.

BG, in the immortal words of our esteemed fellow member, Pontic ~ ~ ~

noli illegitimi carborundum

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-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1244 posts in 245 days


#15 posted 08-04-2018 11:03 PM

BG ~ this is what I came up with for my project.
first of all, my wife thanks you from the bottom of her heart for the idea !!!
this design is not solely my idea – it is a compilation of ideas from around the campus.
I found the joists with the stud finder and verified the locations with exploratory drilling.
there are three 3” screws into the joists and I feel comfortable a 3rd grader can swing on it safely.
as you can see – with the T-Track, you have infinite spacing options.
this is just an example: you can use the wood and colors of your choice (or leave plain silver).
you can use longer eye bolts or cut them to be closer to the T-Nut to make a closer profile.
have fun and work safe !!

.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

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