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Water mark coming through finish

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Forum topic by TGM posted 08-14-2018 07:28 PM 377 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TGM

2 posts in 2996 days


08-14-2018 07:28 PM

I have a cabinet shop making a 6/4 thick black walnut bar top. The material was sanded ready for finish but got some water spilled on it. I assume it happened over night and wasn’t cleaned up until morning. It was dried out and re-sanded. A Watco oil was applied and allowed 72 hours to dry. Three coats of a water based poly recommended by the finish supplier were then applied in a spray booth. It was noticed after it was ready to ship that the finish was damaged in the same area that had water damage. Any ideas on what went wrong and how to correct?


7 replies so far

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bondogaposis

4925 posts in 2467 days


#1 posted 08-14-2018 10:51 PM

The moisture wasn’t fully dried before the Watco oil was put over it, then it was sealed in and reacted with the water base poly. Best recourse is to sand it off and allow to thoroughly dry, then begin again.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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TGM

2 posts in 2996 days


#2 posted 08-15-2018 02:11 AM

Thanks. We are starting over and switching to an oil based stain and poly to be safe.

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bilyo

302 posts in 1218 days


#3 posted 08-15-2018 02:37 AM



Thanks. We are starting over and switching to an oil based stain and poly to be safe.

- TGM


Considering your experience with the Watco oil, wouldn’t it make more sense to use a water based stain and poly?

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Rich

3524 posts in 705 days


#4 posted 08-15-2018 05:14 AM

For me, with a beautiful wood like walnut, I’d never use stain, or even Danish oil. I’d spray three or four coats of pre-cat lacquer. Sher-Wood Hi-Bild is tough as nails, and brings out all of the depth of a beautiful wood like walnut. If it’s a super rough environment that the lacquer can’t stand up to, go with conversion varnish. It’s pricier but will give you the same depth.

I just can’t bring myself to use waterborne poly. I’ve tried, and even with the oil underneath, it’s flat.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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rwe2156

3069 posts in 1596 days


#5 posted 08-15-2018 01:00 PM

Rich, I generally agree with you but actually, the appearance of walnut (or just about any wood) can be enhanced and made much richer by use of an appropriate dye. A used a medium brown dye on a recent project & it really made the walnut look better. In this case it was vertical grain walnut.

But it all depends on the wood. I agree most walnut is pretty just the way it is, but sometimes it needs a little “something”. Try it sometime.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Rich

3524 posts in 705 days


#6 posted 08-15-2018 01:59 PM


Rich, I generally agree with you but actually, the appearance of walnut (or just about any wood) can be enhanced and made much richer by use of an appropriate dye. A used a medium brown dye on a recent project & it really made the walnut look better. In this case it was vertical grain walnut.

But it all depends on the wood. I agree most walnut is pretty just the way it is, but sometimes it needs a little “something”. Try it sometime.

- rwe2156

It’s all a matter of personal taste. That’s why we do test boards, although I don’t have plans for any walnut projects in the near future.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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OSU55

1830 posts in 2105 days


#7 posted 08-17-2018 08:16 PM



Rich, I generally agree with you but actually, the appearance of walnut (or just about any wood) can be enhanced and made much richer by use of an appropriate dye. A used a medium brown dye on a recent project & it really made the walnut look better. In this case it was vertical grain walnut.

- rwe2156


I use some color on most everything, sometimes very little, sometimes a lot – to my eye it always helps, just in different ways.

As to the water spot, probably would have happened regardless of the finish – the spot wasnt dry. Not sure its necessary to change the finish schedule. My preference when using a wb topcoat is to use shellac under it to improve chatoyance vs oil – better adhesion. I do agree that no matter what is done with wb it still doesnt look as good as oil based varnish or lacquer. Precat laquer is great except in the winter when I cant ventilate enough.

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