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Forum topic by anthonyhm posted 08-19-2018 05:19 PM 291 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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anthonyhm

5 posts in 45 days


08-19-2018 05:19 PM

Hi there, I’m putting together a large butcher block table top and matching coffee table for a client and unfortunately it cracked when I was cleaning it up. Any suggestions on how to stabilize these?

 photo WP_20180818_13_45_47_Pro_zpshp2th0z2.jpg


8 replies so far

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John Smith

1308 posts in 278 days


#1 posted 08-19-2018 06:22 PM

what kind of wood is that ? (looks like Southern Yellow Pine).
and – while “cleaning it up” what were you doing to it ??

.

.

-- some people are like a Slinky - - - pretty much good for nothing. But still make you smile when you push them down a flight of stairs.

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anthonyhm

5 posts in 45 days


#2 posted 08-19-2018 06:24 PM

It’s Douglas fir actually and it didn’t actually crack while I was working on it I should say, I noticed it when I pulled it out to work on it.

A little background, it’s a slab that’s 35” x 72” and about 2 23/32” thick with a taper to about 1 15/16”. I’m planning the thick end down to match the thinner thickness right now.

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bondogaposis

4925 posts in 2467 days


#3 posted 08-19-2018 07:16 PM

Saw it off and replace.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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anthonyhm

5 posts in 45 days


#4 posted 08-19-2018 09:36 PM

Well that’s an option, I was hoping to avoid that, thus the reach out for suggestions.

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Rich

3524 posts in 705 days


#5 posted 08-19-2018 10:14 PM

If it were me, I’d toss it and build something out of real hardwood. It looks like scrap glued together. I can’t imagine what “client” would be paying for that.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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anthonyhm

5 posts in 45 days


#6 posted 08-19-2018 11:23 PM



If it were me, I d toss it and build something out of real hardwood. It looks like scrap glued together. I can t imagine what “client” would be paying for that.

- Rich

Thanks for being constructive Rich. It’s helpful advice like this that makes everyone love these forums.

Thanks for the suggestions guys, I’ll likely just saw it off like Bondo mentioned.

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CaptainKlutz

447 posts in 1610 days


#7 posted 08-19-2018 11:30 PM

Not a surprise?
That crack near glue line was an accident waiting to happen! Is due the huge difference in grain density of the two pieces of wood. Cut off the fine grain wood, and glue another piece on with similar large grain density/direction if you need the width.
If you have any other areas of top with similar large changes in grain density, more cracks will probably happen during normal temp/humidity changes.

+1 – use a hardwood for table top.
Douglas Fir is softwood and makes a lousy butcher block surface as it dents easily. Remember, Wood is cheap compared to expensive customer repairs/returns.

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

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anthonyhm

5 posts in 45 days


#8 posted 08-19-2018 11:49 PM


Not a surprise?
That crack near glue line was an accident waiting to happen! Is due the huge difference in grain density of the two pieces of wood. Cut off the fine grain wood, and glue another piece on with similar large grain density/direction if you need the width.
If you have any other areas of top with similar large changes in grain density, more cracks will probably happen during normal temp/humidity changes.

+1 – use a hardwood for table top.
Douglas Fir is softwood and makes a lousy butcher block surface as it dents easily. Remember, Wood is cheap compared to expensive customer repairs/returns.

- CaptainKlutz

Thanks Klutz, I appreciate the explanation and the suggestion. I can’t take responsibility for the original glue-up. This is actually an old piece of the Santa Monica College auditorium sound reflector that was around the stage that they wanted turned into a piece for the story more than anything.

I normally agree with your hardwood suggestion as well, although the dense grain in fir does make it tougher than some other wood which is why I’m interested with working with it here. In any case, I appreciate the response. Thanks.

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