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I need some advice on how to fix a split in walnut.

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Forum topic by jutsFL posted 11-15-2018 02:34 AM 919 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jutsFL

103 posts in 47 days


11-15-2018 02:34 AM

Topic tags/keywords: fix wood

Ok. so I’m in the process of making a coffee table, have it all cut and ready, for joining at least. And I notice the crack coming from a beautiful knot on the wood. It extends down from the center of the knot, out and down to nearly the full thickess of that board (individual 1/3 of board, as the legs are 1/3 sections of heart wood and sapwood walnut.)

Ive thought maybe pushing some epoxy in, and sanding excess…
Even thought so far as to tap all 4 legs w 1 1/2in screws and 1/2forstner recess – to which I even made plugs out of the scrap wood.

Hoping somebody chimes in with the classic,” been doin it this way for 35 yrs here ands never failed me yet!”

I want something that can look as best as reasonable, bond enough to stop the split. And hopefully not involve me in a weekend seminar just to figure out how to do it :D

-- I've quickly learned that being a woodworker isn't about making flawless work, rather it's fixing all the mistakes you made so that it appears flawless to others! Jay - FL


12 replies so far

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lumbering_on

574 posts in 696 days


#1 posted 11-15-2018 03:37 AM

Is this your own furniture? It’s a rather slight crack, and if it’s stable, have you thought about just having this be your inside face?

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jutsFL

103 posts in 47 days


#2 posted 11-15-2018 12:58 PM

It is for me… But I really like the appearance of that face, and id like to have it facing out :/

-- I've quickly learned that being a woodworker isn't about making flawless work, rather it's fixing all the mistakes you made so that it appears flawless to others! Jay - FL

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John Smith

1491 posts in 369 days


#3 posted 11-15-2018 01:22 PM

Jay – fill it with clear epoxy, sand smooth, and continue on with your project.
it will turn out just fine. UNLESS – you are going to use any kind of stain or color
on it. that must be done first, then address the “flaw” in the wood. (I like the knot also).

assuming you are going to run it through a power jointer ??
if so, run it over the blades in the direction of the defect so it won’t get worse.
hand planing would be in the opposite direction.

.

-- I started out with nothing in life ~ and still have most of it left.

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jutsFL

103 posts in 47 days


#4 posted 11-15-2018 01:35 PM



Jay – fill it with clear epoxy, sand smooth, and continue on with your project.
it will turn out just fine. UNLESS – you are going to use any kind of stain or color
on it. that must be done first, then address the “flaw” in the wood. (I like the knot also).

assuming you are going to run it through a power jointer ??
if so, run it over the blades in the direction of the defect so it won t get worse.
hand planing would be in the opposite direction.

.

.

- John Smith

Epoxy sounds like the trick then. Just planning on a home made varnish, so with that epoxy should be fine first, correct?

-- I've quickly learned that being a woodworker isn't about making flawless work, rather it's fixing all the mistakes you made so that it appears flawless to others! Jay - FL

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lumbering_on

574 posts in 696 days


#5 posted 11-15-2018 01:44 PM

Epoxy will be fine, but you should test out a bit of colour with it. You could also use baking soda and CA glue (i.e. superglue), this you will need to colour . You should test out all three with a piece of scrap just to see how you like the look.

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John Smith

1491 posts in 369 days


#6 posted 11-15-2018 01:44 PM

if it were my project, yes, that is what I would do.
then there are those that live in the CA camp, but that is another
technique all together.
looking forward to seeing your completed project – looks good so far.

.

.

-- I started out with nothing in life ~ and still have most of it left.

View Jack Lewis's profile

Jack Lewis

350 posts in 1284 days


#7 posted 11-15-2018 05:00 PM

I like this idea. Run a thin line of Titebond along the crack, dust it with sanding dust from the same wood if you can and sand vigorously with a coarser grit. The diust will adhere to the glue in the crack and blend in. Take a pencil and accent the darker grains where it crosses the crack. Sand smooth to final grit. The glue will help stop the crack also.

-- "PLUMBER'S BUTT! Get over it, everybody has one"

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ArtMann

1161 posts in 1022 days


#8 posted 11-15-2018 05:49 PM

Any attempt at repair will be visual only. You will not be able to get enough glue deep enough into the crack to provide any measurable increase in strength or prevent more splitting under stress.

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jutsFL

103 posts in 47 days


#9 posted 11-16-2018 04:47 AM

I cant thank you all enough for the input. Any tips as a beginner are greatly appreciated. I went with the clear epoxy, and satisfied with what ive got. It seeped in pretty well, and applied with a tooth pick – stay fairly “in the lines.” All and all, I feel like this one will be a success once sander out :)

-- I've quickly learned that being a woodworker isn't about making flawless work, rather it's fixing all the mistakes you made so that it appears flawless to others! Jay - FL

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John Smith

1491 posts in 369 days


#10 posted 11-16-2018 12:14 PM

and there ya go !!
looking forward to seeing your completed project.
(what part of FL are you in ??)

.

.

-- I started out with nothing in life ~ and still have most of it left.

View CharlesNeil's profile (online now)

CharlesNeil

2457 posts in 4076 days


#11 posted 11-16-2018 02:50 PM

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jutsFL

103 posts in 47 days


#12 posted 11-16-2018 04:29 PM



and there ya go !!
looking forward to seeing your completed project.
(what part of FL are you in ??)

.

.

- John Smith

In stuart/Jensen beach area now, had been in Orlando for the last 17yrs beforw the recent move here.

-- I've quickly learned that being a woodworker isn't about making flawless work, rather it's fixing all the mistakes you made so that it appears flawless to others! Jay - FL

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